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Danielle Robichaud

When you were a kid, did your parents ever tell you to stand up straight?

Mine did!  ...I probably should've listened.  This rebellious nature lead me to have rounded shoulders, a sway back and a neck that craned forward.  Oh yeah, and a lot of pain, too.  It was then that I started my journey to have better posture and less pain. 

I dabbled in many posture therapies, but ultimately decided on a career in massage therapy.  I was looking and feeling better after graduating from the International Professional School of Bodywork (San Diego, CA) in 2006 with over 1000 hours under my belt.  I moved to Utah shortly after and got big into the Anusara (alignment based) yoga scene.  I found that my clients who also did yoga (or any type of exercise, for that matter) seemed to get better much faster. I got certified in yoga in 2009 so I could start giving clients corrective exercises to aid in their healing process.  Everything was going great until some undiagnosed scoliosis disrupted my life and almost forced me out of my profession.  I always loved the corrective nature of Structural Integration so I decided to pull the trigger and go to school for it.  It was the direction I was leaning towards and I knew it would heal my body in the process.  I became certified in Alignment Therapy from The Structural Integration Institute (Salt Lake City, UT) in 2012.  It was an exciting time! Not only was I pain-free, but I started seeing better and more lasting results in my clients.  

In 2015, when I couldn't take the cold weather any longer, I moved back to sunny San Diego.  I took a side job as a cocktail server while I was growing my practice.  The heavy trays and distorted posture it put on my body brought back the issues I had with scoliosis.  I knew tons of ways to manage pain, but ultimately knew it was time to get the Structural Integration 12-Session Series done, again.  Now, with my body healed once more, I'm on a mission to help others heal theirs.  Let's face it, pain sucks! Fortunately, it doesn't have to be that way.